How-to Get Involved in Your Child’s Education?

How-to Get Involved in Your Child’s Education?

The home envi­ron­ment, your expec­ta­tions, the pro­vi­sion of sup­port, your atti­tude, the way you go about life, how you engage with your child, the pro­vi­sion of oppor­tu­ni­ties for learn­ing, and how you sup­port your child’s teach­ers and school will spark suc­cess dur­ing education.

If you raise your chil­dren to feel that they can accom­plish any goal or task they decide upon, you will have suc­ceeded as a par­ent and you will have given your chil­dren the great­est of all bless­ings.” ~ Brian Tracy

Your role as a parent

The most impor­tant fac­tor in your child’s suc­cess is your involve­ment – it will con­tribute to your child’s grades, test scores, pos­i­tive atti­tude, qual­ity of home­work, school atten­dance, like­li­hood of grad­u­a­tion and enroll­ment in higher edu­ca­tion. Remem­ber that you’re in the best posi­tion to make a dif­fer­ence in your child’s aca­d­e­mic and life­long edu­ca­tion. Focus your efforts on the home envi­ron­ment; your expec­ta­tions for your child, the pro­vi­sion of sup­port, your atti­tude, the way you go about life, how you engage with your child, the pro­vi­sion of oppor­tu­ni­ties for learn­ing, and how you sup­port your child’s teach­ers and school.

Effec­tive parent-involvement practices

Be warm and sup­port­ive of your child’s actions as a fam­ily. Empha­size the impor­tance of learn­ing, self-sufficiency and hard work. Pro­vide oppor­tu­ni­ties for read­ing, writ­ing and dis­cus­sions with fam­ily mem­bers. Dis­cuss the day’s events, for exam­ple, while shar­ing meals. Take advan­tage of resources avail­able from the com­mu­nity. Get­ting involved with the school’s instruc­tional pro­gram, for exam­ple, will improve her atti­tude about the school.

Estab­lish a rou­tine – get­ting ready for school…chores…having din­ner together…bedtime – to teach her about respon­si­bil­i­ties, pri­or­i­ties and self-discipline. Dis­cuss the day’s events help­ing her learn to reflect, com­mu­ni­cate with adults, and apply critical-thinking skills. Dis­cover your child’s domain of intel­li­gence to sup­port her edu­ca­tion, allow­ing her to expand her tal­ents, exper­i­ment, and bal­ance skills and inter­ests. If your child has bodily-kinesthetic intel­li­gence, for exam­ple, she will appre­ci­ate the value of prac­tice and hard work by learn­ing bal­let. Tell rel­a­tives and friends about her accom­plish­ments giv­ing her atten­tion and show­ing that you and the com­mu­nity value her hard work.

Be a part­ner in your child’s edu­ca­tion – work with teach­ers, schools and the com­mu­nity. Pro­vide after-school care and super­vised activ­i­ties, and mon­i­tor out-of-school activ­i­ties. Encour­age her to social­ize, be active, and play by lim­it­ing tele­vi­sion time. Let her know that it’s okay to make mis­takes by cre­at­ing an envi­ron­ment of non-perfectionism.

Ref­er­ences:

Bar­ber, J., Parizeau, N. & Bergman, L. (2002). Spark Your Child’s Suc­cess in Math and Sci­ence. Great Explo­rations in Math and Sci­ence. Uni­ver­sity of Cal­i­for­nia at Berke­ley. Berke­ley, California.

Rimm, S. & Rimm, S. (2008). Why Bright Kids Get Poor Grades and What You Can Do about It: A Six-Step. Great Poten­tial Press, Inc. Scotts­dale, Arizona.


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