Interpersonal Learner

Interpersonal Learner

Chil­dren with inter­per­sonal intel­li­gence can under­stand the moods, moti­va­tions, tem­pera­ments and inten­tions of oth­ers, and empathize with the feel­ings of oth­ers. Inter­per­sonal learn­ers enjoy being around peo­ple, have many friends and enjoy par­tic­i­pat­ing in social activities.

“Being unwanted, unloved, uncared for, for­got­ten by every­body, I think that is a much greater hunger, a much greater poverty than the per­son who has noth­ing to eat.” ~ Mother Teresa

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Chil­dren with inter­per­sonal intel­li­gence enjoy being around peo­ple, have many friends and enjoy par­tic­i­pat­ing in social activ­i­ties. Inter­per­sonal learn­ers enjoy relat­ing to oth­ers and par­tic­i­pat­ing in cooperative/collaborative activ­i­ties such as paired prob­lem solv­ing or think-pair-share activ­i­ties. They can under­stand the moods, moti­va­tions, tem­pera­ments and inten­tions of oth­ers, and empathize with the feel­ings of oth­ers. Some­times, they can inter­pret voice, facial expres­sion and ges­ture of oth­ers. Inter­per­son­ally intel­li­gent peo­ple can influ­ence oth­ers to fol­low a cer­tain line of action.

Dis­cover your child’s inter­per­sonal intelligence

Does your child enjoy inter­act­ing with peo­ple? Does she have many friends? Does she enjoy social­iz­ing at school, work or home? Does she love to com­mu­ni­cate, orga­nize or manip­u­late activ­i­ties? Does she learn by relat­ing and coop­er­at­ing? Does she often par­tic­i­pate in group activ­i­ties? Does she act as the fam­ily medi­a­tor when­ever dis­putes arise? Does she have empa­thy for the feel­ings of oth­ers? Does she respond clev­erly to the moods and tem­pera­ments of oth­ers? If you answered yes to any of these ques­tions, she may be an inter­per­sonal student.

Use appro­pri­ate meth­ods and assess­ment instruments

Inter­per­sonal stu­dents respond well to peer tutor­ing, peer teach­ing or rec­i­p­ro­cal teach­ing. They enjoy field trips, shared inquiry, brain­storm­ing and work­ing with the com­mu­nity. Jig­saw expe­ri­ences, teach­ing another stu­dent, think-pair-share activ­i­ties, performance-based assess­ment, sur­veys, inter­views and group projects are appro­pri­ate assess­ment instruments.

Ref­er­ences:
Gard­ner, H. (1993). Frames of Mind: the The­ory of Mul­ti­ple Intel­li­gences (10th Ed.). U.S.A.: Basic Books.
Gard­ner, H. (2006). Mul­ti­ple Intel­li­gences. U.S.A.: Basic Books.
Teele, S. (2004). Over­com­ing Bar­ri­cades to Read­ing: A Mul­ti­ple Intel­li­gences Approach. Cal­i­for­nia: Sage Publications.


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Learning Style

  • http://raisesavvykids.com/skill-development/learning-style-skill-development/how-to-discover-child%e2%80%99s-domain-intelligence-learning-style/ How-to Dis­cover Your Child’s Domain of Intel­li­gence or Learn­ing Style?

    […] is an inter­per­sonal learner if she has the capac­ity to per­ceive and dis­tin­guish dif­fer­ences in moods, […]