Intrapersonal Learner

Intrapersonal Learner

Chil­dren with intrap­er­sonal intel­li­gence have a sense of self-confidence, inde­pen­dence, are strong willed and can moti­vate them­selves to do well in inde­pen­dent projects. Intrap­er­sonal learn­ers like to be alone in their own inner world, and are aware of their strengths, weak­ness and inner feelings.

Phi­los­o­phy is the sci­ence which con­sid­ers truth.” ~ Aristotle

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Chil­dren with intrap­er­sonal intel­li­gence like to be alone in their own inner world, and are aware of their strengths, weak­ness and inner feel­ings. Intrap­er­sonal stu­dents are reflec­tive thinkers. They have a sense of self-confidence, inde­pen­dence, are strong willed and can moti­vate them­selves to do well in inde­pen­dent projects. They pre­fer being alone to pur­sue per­sonal inter­ests, hob­bies or projects. They have an intu­itive abil­ity and have a sense of style, behav­ior or attitude.

Dis­cover your child’s intrap­er­sonal intelligence

Does your child have a deep aware­ness of her inner feel­ings, strengths and weak­nesses? Does she dis­play a sense of inde­pen­dence or a strong will? Is she self-directed? Does she have strong opin­ions about con­tro­ver­sial top­ics? Does she pre­fer her own pri­vate inner world? Does she like to be alone to pur­sue her inter­ests, hob­bies or projects? Does she have a deep sense of self-confidence? Does she have an intu­itive abil­ity? Is she self-motivated and does well in inde­pen­dent projects? Does she have her own unique style of dress­ing, behav­ior or atti­tude? If you answered yes to any of these ques­tions, your child may be an intrap­er­sonal learner.

Use appro­pri­ate meth­ods and assess­ment instruments

Inde­pen­dent projects, activ­i­ties with a focus on thoughts or feel­ings, activ­i­ties that ana­lyze a student’s strengths and weak­nesses, reflec­tion, jour­nal writ­ing, dis­cus­sions of con­tro­ver­sial top­ics, inde­pen­dent projects, and activ­i­ties that help develop self-esteem are appro­pri­ate meth­ods. Per­sonal appli­ca­tion sce­nar­ios, auto­bi­o­graph­i­cal report­ing, per­sonal jour­nals, learn­ing logs, sur­veys and ques­tion­naires, self-identification report­ing, stu­dent self-assessment, and activ­i­ties for set­ting pri­or­i­ties or goals are appro­pri­ate assess­ment instruments.

Ref­er­ences:
Gard­ner, H. (1993). Frames of Mind: the The­ory of Mul­ti­ple Intel­li­gences (10th Ed.). U.S.A.: Basic Books.
Gard­ner, H. (2006). Mul­ti­ple Intel­li­gences. U.S.A.: Basic Books.
Teele, S. (2004). Over­com­ing Bar­ri­cades to Read­ing: A Mul­ti­ple Intel­li­gences Approach. Cal­i­for­nia: Sage Publications.


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Learning Style

  • http://raisesavvykids.com/education/learning-style-skill-development/how-to-discover-child%e2%80%99s-domain-intelligence-learning-style/ How-to Dis­cover Your Child’s Domain of Intel­li­gence or Learn­ing Style?

    […] is an intrap­er­sonal learner if she has the capac­ity for self-knowledge – accu­rate pic­ture of her strengths and […]