Kinesthetic Learner

Kinesthetic Learner

Chil­dren with bodily-kinesthetic intel­li­gence pos­sess dex­ter­ity, bal­ance, coor­di­na­tion, strength, flex­i­bil­ity, speed, and tac­tile and hap­tic abil­ity. Kines­thetic learn­ers process infor­ma­tion through bod­ily sen­sa­tions and use their bod­ies in skilled and dif­fer­en­ti­ated ways.

Just play. Have fun. Enjoy the game.” ~ Michael Jordan

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Chil­dren with bodily-kinesthetic intel­li­gence process infor­ma­tion through bod­ily sen­sa­tions and use their bod­ies in skilled and dif­fer­en­ti­ated ways – they pos­sess dex­ter­ity, bal­ance, coor­di­na­tion, strength, flex­i­bil­ity, speed, and tac­tile and hap­tic abil­ity. Remem­ber that bodily-kinesthetic learn­ers can­not sit still for long with­out any move­ment as they have to engage the motor cor­tex part of the brain.

Dis­cover your child’s bodily-kinesthetic intelligence

Does your child love to learn by mov­ing around, touch­ing or act­ing? Does she move, twitch, tap or fid­get while sit­ting? Does she love to par­tic­i­pate in phys­i­cal activ­i­ties or sports, games and action packed sto­ries? Does she touch peo­ple while talk­ing to them? Does she do well in skills, such as clay mod­el­ing, that use hands? Does she enjoy hands-on and active learn­ing expe­ri­ences? If you answered yes to any of these ques­tions, your child may be bodily-kinesthetically intelligent.

Use appro­pri­ate meth­ods and assess­ment instruments

Use manip­u­la­tives to sup­port con­tent knowl­edge; hands-on activ­i­ties; drama and dance; act­ing out infor­ma­tion; games, sim­u­la­tions and activ­i­ties that sup­port move­ment; phys­i­cal activ­i­ties; lab­o­ra­tory exper­i­ments; and mod­el­ing activ­i­ties. The song “Lis­ten and Move,” for exam­ple, allows chil­dren to learn vocab­u­lary words. Performance-based assess­ments; lab exper­i­ments; projects; sci­en­tific inves­ti­ga­tions; problem-based learn­ing; skill demon­stra­tions; hands-on pre­sen­ta­tions; illus­tra­tion of knowl­edge using bod­ily lan­guage and ges­tures; and impro­vi­sa­tions are appro­pri­ate assess­ment instruments.

Ref­er­ences:
Gard­ner, H. (1993). Frames of Mind: the The­ory of Mul­ti­ple Intel­li­gences (10th Ed.). U.S.A.: Basic Books.
Gard­ner, H. (2006). Mul­ti­ple Intel­li­gences. U.S.A.: Basic Books.
Teele, S. (2004). Over­com­ing Bar­ri­cades to Read­ing: A Mul­ti­ple Intel­li­gences Approach. Cal­i­for­nia: Sage Publications.


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Learning Style

  • http://raisesavvykids.com/skill-development/learning-style-skill-development/how-to-discover-child%e2%80%99s-domain-intelligence-learning-style/ How-to Dis­cover Your Child’s Domain of Intel­li­gence or Learn­ing Style?

    […] has bodily-kinesthetic intel­li­gence if she has the abil­ity to use her body – skills such as coor­di­na­tion, balance, […]