Musical Learner

Musical Learner

Chil­dren with musi­cal intel­li­gence appre­ci­ate pitch, rhythm and tim­bre, and can tell when a note is off key. Musi­cal learn­ers are sen­si­tive to sounds, enjoy music, like to play musi­cal instru­ments, and pre­fer lis­ten­ing to music when study­ing or working.

“Beethoven can write music, thank God, but he can do noth­ing else on earth.”  ~ Lud­wig van Beethoven

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Chil­dren with musi­cal intel­li­gence are sen­si­tive to sounds, enjoy music, like to play musi­cal instru­ments, and pre­fer lis­ten­ing to music when study­ing or work­ing. Musi­cal learn­ers appre­ci­ate pitch, rhythm and tim­bre, and can tell when a note is off key. They have an intu­itive and tech­ni­cal under­stand­ing of music and can inter­pret dif­fer­ent types of music. Musi­cal learn­ers often sing songs and hum or whis­tle to themselves.

Dis­cover your child’s musi­cal intelligence

Is your child sen­si­tive to a vari­ety of sounds? Does she enjoy music and/or play­ing a musi­cal instru­ment? Does she remem­ber melodies of songs? Is she able to detect a musi­cal note when it’s off key? Does she enjoy relax­ing with music? Does she like to col­lect, tapes, records or mp3s? Does she keep time rhyth­mi­cally to music? Does she hum or whis­tle? If you answered yes to any of these ques­tions, she may be a musi­cal learner.

Use appro­pri­ate meth­ods and assess­ment instruments

Musi­cal learn­ers respond to oppor­tu­ni­ties such as per­for­mances with music, the­atri­cal tech­niques, games with rhythm and rhyme, clap­ping, or click­ing to words or sounds. They learn best when vocal or lyri­cal sounds matches the topic being taught in a musi­cal way. Activ­i­ties such as raps, chants, lim­er­icks, haiku, cre­at­ing or singing songs, song analy­sis, role play­ing, research­ing top­ics related to music, and musi­cal per­for­mances are use­ful in engag­ing musi­cal learn­ers. Musi­cal learn­ers can retain and apply infor­ma­tion by clap­ping their hands, snap­ping their fin­gers, chant­ing words or mov­ing rhyth­mi­cally.  Songs such as “Months of the Year,” “Wee Sing Dinosaurs,” “Let­ters and Num­bers,” “Phon­ics,” and “Chem­istry Song­bag” are pop­u­lar teach­ing tools.  Cre­at­ing songs and raps, com­pos­ing music or musi­cals, uti­liz­ing rhyme or rhyth­mic pat­terns for expla­na­tions, ana­lyz­ing and com­par­ing musi­cal struc­tures, and repro­duc­ing musi­cal and/or rhyth­mic pat­terns match­ing aca­d­e­mic con­text are appro­pri­ate assess­ment methods.

Ref­er­ences:
Gard­ner, H. (1993). Frames of Mind: the The­ory of Mul­ti­ple Intel­li­gences (10th Ed.). U.S.A.: Basic Books.
Gard­ner, H. (2006). Mul­ti­ple Intel­li­gences. U.S.A.: Basic Books.
Teele, S. (2004). Over­com­ing Bar­ri­cades to Read­ing: A Mul­ti­ple Intel­li­gences Approach. Thou­sand Oaks, Cal­i­for­nia: Sage Publications.


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Learning Style

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    […] has musi­cal intel­li­gence if she has sen­si­tiv­ity to rhythm, pitch, tim­bre, and tone and has the abil­ity to […]