Making Your Child’s School Experience Positive

Making Your Child’s School Experience Positive

Help your child muster a pos­i­tive atti­tude about school, home­work and teach­ers. Show con­cern and be con­sid­er­ate in prob­lem sit­u­a­tions. Look for solu­tions, be sen­si­tive, but encour­ag­ing about her progress.

The dif­fer­ence between school and life? In school, you’re taught a les­son and then given a test. In life, you’re given a test that teaches you a les­son.” ~ Tom Bodett

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Your child will learn about atti­tude from you. Tell her about your school expe­ri­ence. Focus on the good with­out deny­ing the tough parts. She’ll feel a lot bet­ter and feel pos­i­tive about her own sit­u­a­tion with­out the extra neg­a­tive bag­gage. Joseph DiMartino and John Clarke argue that it‘s impor­tant to help your child muster a pos­i­tive atti­tude about school, home­work and teach­ers. Work directly with the teacher if you’re con­cerned about some­thing in your child’s school expe­ri­ence. Laugh with her about sit­u­a­tions or less-than-perfect teachers.

Show con­cern and be con­sid­er­ate
Be con­cerned rather than angry or frus­trated in prob­lem sit­u­a­tions. Inex­pe­ri­enced teach­ers often resort to a crop-dusting approach to sit­u­a­tions pro­vid­ing all stu­dents with the same rem­edy. Most teach­ers will be happy to work with you to change your child’s sit­u­a­tion. If your child com­plains about math and sci­ence, for exam­ple, show her how excit­ing math and sci­ence can be. She may never be able to reach her full poten­tial from a pat­tern of avoid­ance and lack of self-confidence. Let her know that she could weather all kinds of peo­ple and sit­u­a­tions just fine.

Look for solu­tions
Bar­ber et al. rec­om­mend talk­ing to her about what she dis­likes. Ask sug­ges­tions from experts for deal­ing with the sit­u­a­tion. Con­sider get­ting a tutor for her. Pro­vide oppor­tu­ni­ties such as a trip to the museum, nature game or math games that are stress free. Encour­age sci­ence and math group activ­i­ties with other chil­dren. Ask rel­a­tives to take on the role of a men­tor if you’re not com­fort­able with the sub­ject. Be sen­si­tive, but encour­ag­ing about her progress.

Ref­er­ences:
Bar­ber, J., Parizeau, N. & Bergman, L. (2002). Spark Your Child’s Suc­cess in Math and Sci­ence. Great Explo­rations in Math and Sci­ence. Cal­i­for­nia: Uni­ver­sity of Cal­i­for­nia at Berke­ley.
DiMartino, J. & Clarke, J. (2008). Per­son­al­iz­ing the High School Expe­ri­ence for Each Stu­dent. Vir­ginia: ASCD.


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