Do You Have a Talented or Gifted Child?

Do You Have a Talented or Gifted Child?

Tal­ent or gift­ed­ness refers to intel­li­gence quo­tient scores, performance-defined or domain-specific gift­ed­ness. Chil­dren with abil­i­ties in arts and music are con­sid­ered tal­ented, while those with abil­i­ties in math­e­mat­ics and sci­ence are con­sid­ered gifted. Gift­ed­ness refers to nat­ural abil­i­ties, while tal­ent refers to sys­tem­at­i­cally devel­op­ing abilities.

The test of a first-rate intel­li­gence is the abil­ity to hold two opposed ideas in the mind at the same time, and still retain the abil­ity to func­tion.” ~ F. Scott Fitzgerald

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Chris­tine Mac­In­tyre, the author of ‘Gifted and Tal­ented Chil­dren 4 — 11,’ says that the first few years in a child’s life has a great influ­ence on her even­tual devel­op­ment. Give her every pos­si­ble advan­tage dur­ing the for­ma­tive years and soon enough, you’ll see her spe­cial abil­i­ties or accom­plish­ments. Tal­ent or gift­ed­ness gen­er­ally refers to intel­li­gence quo­tient scores, performance-defined or domain-specific gift­ed­ness. Gen­er­ally, chil­dren with abil­i­ties in arts and music are con­sid­ered tal­ented, while those with abil­i­ties in math­e­mat­ics and sci­ence are con­sid­ered gifted. Gift­ed­ness refers to nat­ural abil­i­ties, while tal­ent refers to sys­tem­at­i­cally devel­op­ing abil­i­ties. Tal­ent or gift­ed­ness con­sid­er­ably increases the odds of suc­cess in life.

Janet Bates and Sarah Mun­day, the authors of ‘Able, Gifted and Tal­ented,’ argue that intel­li­gence quo­tient tests assess the abil­ity to rea­son, com­pre­hend com­plex ideas, learn quickly, think abstractly, plan and solve prob­lems as a mea­sure of intel­lec­tual func­tion­ing. Intel­li­gence quo­tient is not an aca­d­e­mic skill, but a broader and deeper capa­bil­ity to com­pre­hend sit­u­a­tions, make sense out of things, and fig­ure out what to do. Olszeweski-Kubilius et al. say that chil­dren have intel­li­gence quo­tient scores rang­ing from below 70 to above 150. Less that 3 per­cent of the pop­u­la­tion have intel­li­gence quo­tient scores above 130.

Gift­ed­ness is mea­sured in terms of behav­iors or per­for­mances such as gifted musi­cal per­for­mance. Gift­ed­ness results from above-average abil­ity, cre­ativ­ity, and moti­va­tion and per­sis­tence. Lin­guis­tic, musi­cal, logical-mathematical, spa­tial, bodily-kinesthetic, intrap­er­sonal, inter­per­sonal and nat­u­ral­is­tic are eight dis­tinct areas of known intel­li­gence. Olszeweski-Kubilius et al. argue that the con­cept of spe­cific apti­tude within a domain of human activ­ity is based on this domain-specific approach to gift­ed­ness. The advan­tage of this con­cept is that per­for­mances in var­i­ous domains are eas­ily vis­i­ble. Remem­ber that the major­ity of chil­dren show gift­ed­ness in one or two areas only and the idea of a child being “glob­ally gifted” is a myth.

Ref­er­ences:
Bates, J. & Mun­day, S. (2005). Able, Gifted and Tal­ented. Lon­don: Con­tin­uum Inter­na­tional Pub­lish­ing.
Mac­In­tyre, C. (2008). Gifted and Tal­ented Chil­dren 4–11. Oxford: Rout­ledge.
Olszeweski-Kubilius, P., Limburg-Weber, L. & Pfeif­fer, S. (2003). Early Gifts: Rec­og­niz­ing and Nur­tur­ing Children’s Tal­ents. Texas: Prufrock Press.

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